Barrier-breaking body movements in the after-school programme: Children's imitation through play

Author(s)

Publication date

2010

Series/Report no

Nordic Studies in Education;30 (1)

Publisher

Universitetsforlaget

Document type

Abstract

This article investigates how children learn body movements in informal social situations, and is based upon close observation and qualitative research interviews undertaken among eightand nine-year-old children in an after-school programme (ASP) in Oslo. The learning process is described and discussed in relation to the concepts of imitation, joint attention and turn-taking. The study shows that learning body movements is usual during child-managed activities in the ASP, and occurs frequently as imitation. The imitation process is characterized by joint attention and turn-taking. In best-friend groups, joint attention, characterized by shared involvement along with intuitive turn-taking, is predominant. In activity groups that come together occasionally, considerable initiative is required on the part of the imitator in order to become an active part of a mutual process. It is recommended to encourage child-managed activities in ASP, and emphasize the ASP’s complimentary role in contrast to the school.

Keywords

Version

Postprint version of published article. Original can be found at URL: http://www.idunn.no/ts/np/2010/01/art03

Permanent URL (for citation purposes)

  • http://hdl.handle.net/10642/504